Рус Eng During last 365 days Approved articles: 2000,   Articles in work: 331 Declined articles: 802 
Library
Articles and journals | Tariffs | Payments | Your profile

Back to contents

“White” Africans in modern Great Britain: specificity of migrants from South Africa
Karpov Grigory

PhD in History

Junior Research Associate at the Institute for African Studies, Russian Academy of Sciences

123001, Russia, Moscow, ul. Spiridonovka, 30/1

gkarpov86@mail.ru
Другие публикации этого автора
 

 

Abstract.

This article is dedicated to examination of the migration from South Africa to Great Britain during the XX-XXI centuries, as well as peculiarities of establishment of the South African diaspora in the country. The author meticulously reviews the dynamics of migration flow from South Africa to Great Britain throughout the XX century, the key channels of arrival and ways of legalization of South Africans at the turn of the XX-XXI centuries. Special attention is given to analysis of discrepancies between the migration of South Africans of European ancestry and migration of the indigenous African population of South Africa. The specificity of identity of the persons of South African descent with British roots and the role of English language for the migrants from South Africa is examined in details. Before the fall of Apartheid regime in 1994, the migration of South Africans to Great Britain did not carry mass character; it has reached its pinnacle in the end of 1990’s – 2000’s. The absolute majority of South Africans in Great Britain are referred to the ethnic group of the “White” and represents the migrants of British (less commonly European) descent. The portion of the indigenous African population among the migrants from South Africa does not exceed 3-4%. South African diaspora is a rare case of extremely successful and non-confrontational integration to British society. For South Africa, the outflow of European population has resulted in a heavy shortage of qualified specialists. Overall, the attraction of migrants of European descents from South Africa, perhaps, could be favorable for the British authorities, strengthen the British identity and increase the portion of white population in the country.

Keywords: racism, identity, diaspora, integration, migration, United Kingdom, South Africa, apartheid, demography, Africans

DOI:

10.25136/2409-868X.2018.4.25787

Article was received:

20-03-2018


Review date:

21-03-2018


Publish date:

22-03-2018


This article written in Russian. You can find full text of article in Russian here .

References
1.
Overseas-born population in the United Kingdom, excluding some residents in communal establishments, by sex, by country of birth // Office for National Statistics - http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/migration1/population-by-country-of-birth-and-nationality/2014/rft-table-5-pop-by-cob-jan-14-to-dec-14.xls
2.
Born Abroad – South Africa // BBC News. 07 September 2005. URL: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/shared/spl/hi/uk/05/born_abroad/countries/html/south_africa.stm
3.
Sveinsson K. P., Gumuschian A. Understanding Diversity – South Africans in Multi-Ethnic Britain // Runnymede Trust, 2008. P. 1.
4.
Detailed country of birth and nationality analysis from the 2011 Census of England and Wales // Office for National Statistics, 13 May 2013.
5.
Grants of settlement by country of nationality and category and in-country refusals of settlement // Office for National Statistics. URL: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/593025/settlement-q4-2016-tables.ods
6.
Immigration Statistics - October to December 2016: Citizenship grants by previous country of nationality // Office for National Statistics. URL: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/546762/citizenship-q2-2016-tabs.ods
7.
Immigration Statistics - October to December 2016: Citizenship grants by previous country of nationality and type of grant // Office for National Statistics. URL: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/546762/citizenship-q2-2016-tabs.ods
8.
Asylum applications and initial decisions for main applicants, by country of nationality // Office for National Statistics. URL: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/593027/asylum1-q4-2016-tables.ods
9.
Asylum applications and initial decisions for main applicants and dependants, by country of nationality // Office for National Statistics. URL: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/593027/asylum1-q4-2016-tables.ods
10.
Bezuidenhout H., Claassen C. South African trade hegemony: Is the South Africa–EU Trade, Development and Cooperation Agreement heading for a BRICS wall? // South African Journal of International Affairs, 2013. Vol. 20. Issue 2. P. 231.
11.
Killingray D. Significant Black South Africans in Britain before 1912: Pan-African Organisations and the Emergence of South Africa's First Black Lawyers // South African Historical Journal, 2012. Vol. 64. Issue 3. P. 395-397.
12.
Willan B. ‘Implanting the better instincts of civilisation’? Black South Africans and Shakespeare in Victorian Grahamstown // Journal of African Cultural Studies, 2014. Vol. 26., Issue 1. P. 1-14.
13.
Josiah Tshangana Gumede. URL: http://www.sahistory.org.za/people/josiah-tshangana-gumede
14.
Saul Msane. Sm. podrob.: URL: http://www.sahistory.org.za/people/saul-msane
15.
Colenso G. The 1907 Deputation of Basuto Chiefs to London and the Development of British–South African Networks // The International History Review, 2014. Vol. 34. P. 621.
16.
Karpov G.A. Britanskaya migratsionnaya politika vtoroi poloviny XX – nachala XXI vv.: uroki dlya Rossii // Natsional'naya bezopasnost'. 2017. № 1. S. 15-41.
17.
Lambert J. South African British? Or Dominion South Africans? The Evolution of an Identity in the 1910s and 1920s // Journal South African Historical Journal, 2000. Vol. 43. Issue 1. P. 198.
18.
Mescht H. South African students and other South African connections at the Royal College of Music in London between the end of the Anglo-Boer War and the formation of the Union of South Africa, 1902–1910 // Journal of Music Research in Africa, 2005. Vol. 2. Issue 1. P. 26-46.
19.
Lambert J. ‘Their Finest Hour?' English-speaking South Africans and World War II // South African Historical Journal, 2008. Vol. 60. Issue 1. P. 65.
20.
Mckinney C. ‘If I speak English, does it make me less black anyway?’‘Race’ and English in South African desegregated schools // A Journal of English Studies, 2007. Issue 2. P. 10.
21.
Kajee L. Multimodal representations of identity in the English-as-an-additional-language classroom in South Africa // Language, Culture and Curriculum, 2011. Vol. 24. Issue 3. P. 241-252.
22.
Walt Ch. English as a Language of Learningin South Africa: Whose English? Whose Culture? // Language Awareness, 1997. Vol. 6, Issue 2-3. P. 183-197.
23.
Marten L., Mostert C. Background languages, learner motivation and self-assessed progress in learning Zulu as an additional language in the UK // International Journal of Multilingualism, 2012. Vol. 9, Issue 1. P. 101-128.
24.
Karpov G.A. Demografiya sovremennoi Velikobritanii: vzryv ili krizis? // Sotsiodinamika. 2017. № 9. S. 1-20.
25.
Bezuidenhout H., Claassen C. South African trade hegemony: Is the South Africa–EU Trade, Development and Cooperation Agreement heading for a BRICS wall? // South African Journal of International Affairs, 2013. Vol. 20. Issue 2. P. 228-231.