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Implicit cognitivistics in political science: methodological opportunities for studying ideology
Podshibyakina Tat'yana Aleksandrovna

PhD in Politics

Docent, the department of Theoretical and Applied Political Science, Southern Federal University

344000, Russia, Rostovskaya oblast', g. Rostov-Na-Donu, per. Dneprovskii, 116, of. 114

tan5@bk.ru

Abstract.

The object of this article is the implicit cognitive processes; the subject is the methodology of application of implicit cognitivistics in political science. The goal of this work consists in conceptualization of the research method of the cognitive-ideological matrices using the scientific approaches of implicit cognitivistics. Analysis of the theories of implicit cognitivistics and narratology from the classical to postclassical allows generalizing the methodology of research of the implicit phenomena and processes, as well as assess its heuristic potential and restrictions in application. Special attention is given to the insufficiently studies, both in Russia and abroad, topic of the implicit cognitive processes in the subject field of the political science. The provided original methods of research of the implicit cognitive processes were examined from the perspective of their possible use in the area of studying ideologies. The result of the work became the conceptualization of the new integral approach based on the implicit-cognitivist and narrative methodology that allows operationalizing the concept of “cognitive-ideological matrices”, and the assessment of its potential application in the political practice. The acquired scientific results are valuable in the area of studying the ideological identity, determination and quantification of its individual and group characteristics, as well as the analysis of attitudes and political orientations of various actors, based on the subjective perception of social and political phenomena and processes.

Keywords: implicit association test, Narrative Policy Framework, attitudes, ideology, cognitive-ideological matrix, implicit cognitivistics, explicit cognitivistics, narratology, modeling of cognitive processes, ideological identity

DOI:

10.7256/2454-0684.2018.9.27089

Article was received:

08-08-2018


Review date:

13-08-2018


Publish date:

01-10-2018


This article written in Russian. You can find full text of article in Russian here .

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