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Shlyundt Nadezhda Yuryevna

PhD in Law

assistant professor, Nevinnomyssk State Humanitarian and Technical Institute

357108, Russia, Stavropol'skii krai, g. Nevinnomyssk, bul. Mira, 19a

nshlundt@yandex.ru
Другие публикации этого автора
 

 
Nefedov Sergei Aleksandrovich

Doctor of Politics



357532, Russia, Stavropol'skii krai, g. Pyatigorsk, pr. Kalinina, 9

offiziell@yandex.ru

Abstract.


Keywords: international influence, world politics, foreign policy tools, economic sanctions, political efficacy of sanctions, international system, sanction goals, domestic politics dimension of sanctions, international communications, differentiation of sanction goals

DOI:

10.7256/2454-0641.2018.4.27700

Article was received:

16-10-2018


Review date:

17-10-2018


Publish date:

09-01-2019


This article written in Russian. You can find full text of article in Russian here .

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